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FAQ

User FAQ’s

Why should I consider taking a Cardisiography?

One in three men, and one in five women are at risk of suffering their first heart attack and don’t know about it. Cardisiography is the only screening method that is non-invasive, very accurate and not expensive. Taking a Cardisiography gives you peace of mind.

You have a higher risk for coronary heart disease if you:

  • have a family history of coronary heart disease
  • have smoked over an extended period
  • high blood pressure
  • have a sedentary lifestyle or are overweight

What should I do if I get a positive result on my Cardisiography?

First and foremost, don’t worry.

We have designed the test to take a cautious approach, which means there’s a very low chance of indicating that you don’t have a heart problem if you do. It also means that sometimes the Cardisiography may indicate you should seek medical advice, but on further investigation it is discovered that this is nothing serious to report. This is the safest way to manage the results.

If you receive a positive result, we suggest you consult your doctor and who can decide on the best course of action, which could include further tests or sending you to consult with a cardiologist.

I have family members who have heart disease but I have no symptoms. Is there a good reason for me to take a Cardisiography?

Having close blood relatives who have been diagnosed with coronary heart disease constitutes a risk factor, but it does not mean how have the same condition.

It is important to note that coronary heart disease doesn’t cause any symptoms—until it’s too late and you suffer your first heart attack. That’s what makes the Cardisiograph so ground-breaking – for the first time it’s possible to detect issues in people with no symptoms in a cost effective, low risk and non-invasive way.

How can a Cardisiography detect heart disease when other methods can’t?

The Cardisiography is the first and only effective screening method for coronary heart disease. Other procedures are either insufficiently reliable — such as stress ECG — or they are very invasive and bear risks to the patient — such as a cardio angiogram.

Why do I have to give consent?

Under the recent Data Protection Regulation in the EU, patients must be informed and your permission sought. As this needs to be done at the point where the test it delivered, this isdone by the organization that delivers the test.

Why are the results for women slightly lower than for men?

This is simply due to physical differences between the two and the ease of which electrical signals can be detected.

What happens to the data once it is collected?

All data is stored in Cardisio’s secure cloud server in Frankfurt, Germany, in a way that is compliant with European Union rules and regulations. Once transmitted, the test data is processed using the Cardisio proprietary software using artificial intelligence. The individual report is ‘rendered’ and sent back to the requester. The results are then stored anonymously to aid future research and continuous improvement of the algorithms.

Isn’t the use of Artificial Intelligence Problematic?

Like any technology, artificial intelligence (AI) can be used for good purposes or for bad ones. At Cardisio, we work very hard putting AI to a good use: deploying a neural network is one of the key reasons why the Cardisio results are so accurate. Maximizing the accuracy of our heart screening test is the only purpose for which we use AI.

Are there ethical challenges to Cardisio’s use of Artificial Intelligence?

Ethical issues — such as various forms of biases — arising from the use of AI have become a very active area of academic research. We don’t think there are any ethical issues with our use of AI, but we want to be certain. That’s why we have partnered with the Frankfurt Big Data Lab at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, to conduct an independent ethical assessment of Cardisio’s use of AI. The results will be made public upon completion of the study.

Clinical FAQ’s

What is the intended use of the Cardisiograph?

The Cardisiograph is intended to identify individuals who are asymptomatic but who have underlying CHD and in particular, coronary ischemia.

Isn’t it just an ECG?

It’s significantly more advanced than an ECG. The Cardisiography diagnosis applies a computer-based infinitesimal, three-dimensional calculation of the excitation processes of the mammalian heart. This calculation is based on a specific algorithm in conjunction with a neural network correlated to the intrinsic blood flow, as well as the specific spatial orientation of the myocardium in the dipole field.

Can it be used for large scale screening?

Both the design and the pricing of the make Cardisiography accessible to large groups, and in particular the asymptomatic and undiagnosed CHD sufferers.

Is it possible to use the Cardisiograph remotely?

All you need is a Cardisiograph and a PC that is connected to the internet, in order for the data to be analyzed in the Cardisio Cloud.

What approvals have been granted to Cardisio and in what territories?

The Cardisiograph is approved as a Class 1 medical device in the EU.

What happens once the data is collected?

All data is stored in Cardisio’s secure cloud server in Frankfurt, Germany, in a way that is compliant with European Union rules and regulations. Once transmitted, the test data is processed using the Cardisio proprietary software using artificial intelligence. The individual report is ‘rendered’ and sent back to the requester. The results are then stored anonymously to aid future research and continuous improvement of the algorithms.

Isn’t the use of Artificial Intelligence Problematic?

Like any technology, artificial intelligence (AI) can be used for good purposes or for bad ones. At Cardisio, we work very hard putting AI to a good use: deploying a neural network is one of the key reasons why the Cardisio results are so accurate. Maximizing the accuracy of our heart screening test is the only purpose for which we use AI.

Are there ethical challenges to Cardisio’s use of Artificial Intelligence?

Ethical issues — such as various forms of biases — arising from the use of AI have become a very active area of academic research. We don’t think there are any ethical issues with our use of AI, but we want to be certain. That’s why we have partnered with the Frankfurt Big Data Lab at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, to conduct an independent ethical assessment of Cardisio’s use of AI. The results will be made public upon completion of the study.