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FAQ

User FAQ’s

Why should I consider taking a Cardisiography?

One in three men, and one in five women are at risk of suffering their first heart attack and don’t know about it. Cardisiography is the only screening method that is non-invasive, very accurate and not expensive. Taking a Cardisiography gives you peace of mind.

You have a higher risk for coronary heart disease if you:

  • have a family history of coronary heart disease
  • have smoked over an extended period
  • high blood pressure
  • have a sedentary lifestyle or are overweight

What should I do if I get a positive result on my Cardisiography?

First and foremost, don’t worry.

We have designed the test to take a cautious approach, which means there’s a very low chance of indicating that you don’t have a heart problem if you do. It also means that sometimes the Cardisiography may indicate you should seek medical advice, but on further investigation it is discovered that this is nothing serious to report. This is the safest way to manage the results.

If you receive a positive result, we suggest you consult your doctor and who can decide on the best course of action, which could include further tests or sending you to consult with a cardiologist.

I have family members who have heart disease but I have no symptoms. Is there a good reason for me to take a Cardisiography?

Having close blood relatives who have been diagnosed with coronary heart disease constitutes a risk factor, but it does not mean how have the same condition.

It is important to note that coronary heart disease doesn’t cause any symptoms—until it’s too late and you suffer your first heart attack. That’s what makes the Cardisiograph so ground-breaking – for the first time it’s possible to detect issues in people with no symptoms in a cost effective, low risk and non-invasive way.

How can a Cardisiography detect heart disease when other methods can’t?

The approach to cardisiography comes from the principles of electrophysiology, particularly vector cardiography. In the past there have been many attempts to analyze the electrical propagation of excitation in multidimensional space. Due to the high complexity, however, it is almost impossible for a person to recognize the relationships, to understand them and to carry out the necessary analysis / calculation. As a result, such an approach has so far remained purely theoretical. Suitable hardware with appropriate computing power first had to be developed in order to be able to put the theory into practice. Cardisiography uses an algorithm that evaluates various measured values ​​and parameters. The measurement data is fed into a neural network and analyzed automatically. After almost four years of research and development, cardisiography is now approved as a medical product. Alternative examination methods are either not sufficiently reliable (e.g. ECG or stress ECG) or they are extremely invasive and involve high risks for the patient, e.g. coronary angiography.

Why do I have to give consent?

Under the recent Data Protection Regulation in the EU, patients must be informed and your permission sought. As this needs to be done at the point where the test it delivered, this isdone by the organization that delivers the test.

Why are the results for women slightly lower than for men?

This is simply due to physical differences between the two and the ease of which electrical signals can be detected.

What happens to the data once it is collected?

All data is stored in Cardisio’s secure cloud server in Frankfurt, Germany, in a way that is compliant with European Union rules and regulations. Once transmitted, the test data is processed using the Cardisio proprietary software using artificial intelligence. The individual report is ‘rendered’ and sent back to the requester. The results are then stored anonymously to aid future research and continuous improvement of the algorithms.

Clinical FAQ’s

What is the intended use of the Cardisiography?

Cardisiography is used to make diagnoses in patients who often have no symptoms but have an increased risk of ischemic or structural heart disease.

Isn’t it just an ECG?

The technology used is far more advanced than that of an EKG. Cardisiography is a further development based on vector cardiography. That means it shows the spatial representation of the temporal course of the potential differences generated by the heart, as they are projected onto the body surface. It also provides information on the spatial course of the voltage changes at the time of atrial and ventricular depolarization and ventricular repolarization as a vector. The result of the cardisiography is based on a specific algorithm in connection with a neural network that correlates with the intrinsic blood flow, as well as on the actual spatial orientation of the heart muscle in the dipole field.

Can it be used for large scale screening?

The algorithm, as well as the pricing and automated evaluation, open up access to cardisiography for many people, especially those who do not show symptoms and suffer from ischemic or structural heart disease.

What approvals have been granted to Cardisio and in what territories?

The Cardisio web service is approved as a Class 1 medical device in the EU.

What happens once the data is collected?

All data is stored in Cardisio’s secure cloud server in Frankfurt, Germany, in a way that is compliant with European Union rules and regulations. Once transmitted, the test data is processed using the Cardisio proprietary software using artificial intelligence. The individual report is ‘rendered’ and sent back to the requester. The results are then stored anonymously to aid future research and continuous improvement of the algorithms.