Did you know…

…that 1 in 3 men and 1 in 5 women have an elevated risk for heart attack, and don’t know about it?

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Cardisio – A convenient and easy screening test for coronary heart disease yielding highly accurate results. The combination of scientific advancement and modern technology has created a new category of screening tests that are fast, smart and easy to apply.

Your Companion

The Cardisio screening procedure provides you with a fast and reliable screening result and turns a previously time-consuming and physician-assisted procedure into a fast, smart and easy-to-perform examination.

Cardisio has detected previously undiscovered coronary heart disease in apparently healthy people of all ages. Cardiography is suitable for any adult, regardless of age or health. Most people with coronary artery disease are symptom-free until they have a heart attack.

What makes Cardisio different?

Cardisio is a patent-pending screening method that scans the heart in three dimensions and records blood flow throughout the heart in multiple datasets. Cardisio’s cloud application runs a deep learning algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to reliably determine whether a person is affected by coronary heart disease.

Developed in the Cardisio Research & Development Lab, this 3D screening test fundamentally differs from legacy methods including electrocardiogram (ECG), stress ECG and echocardiography.

Cardisio’s high level of accuracy

The sensitivity of a diagnostic test indicates its accuracy. In this context, the sensitivity indicates the chance that a person who tested negatively is indeed free of coronary heart disease. The higher the sensitivity, the more accurate the test.

Intelligent analysis

Anonymized test data is uploaded to the Cardisio HealthNet cloud application, where it will be compared with thousands of other anonymous datasets. This will provide additional insight into a person’s health, such as how one compares to other people of similar age and risk factors. This data is kept securely in the Cardisio HealthNet—we never share or sell data to third parties.

Experience with Cardisio

Cardisio identified previously unknown coronary heart disease in seemingly healthy people of all ages. In each case the positive Cardisio test led to further examinations and eventual cardiological treatment that prevented heart attack or other major damage. Below are some real-world examples:

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Mai-Lin H., a 53-year-old florist from Hong Kong, visited her general practitioner in January 2019 for her annual checkup. As part of a pilot project, her physician also conducted a Cardisiography test in addition to an ECG.

Mai-Lin felt well overall and had no complaints about her health. All test results (blood work, ECG, lung function, etc.) were within normal range and unremarkable. The Cardisio index was also negative and showed no signs of arteriosclerosis.

However, Cardisiography test’s built-in additional analysis of myocardial flexibility indicated a restriction of isolated muscle parts in the heart.

To confirm, the physician then conducted a stress echocardiography and discovered undeniable evidence of a past myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle).

Since Mai-Lin had no symptoms at the time of the exam, and the inflammation had occurred possibly some time ago, there was no acute risk and she did not have to worry.

Nevertheless, it was very important to diagnose this past condition, as her heart muscle is now slightly weakened, leaving an increased risk of renewed myocarditis. Mai-Lin now knows she needs to be very vigilant in the event of a future infection (sinus, bronchitis, etc.) and her doctor should provide her with antibiotics at an early stage, if necessary, to prevent renewed myocarditis.

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Heiko, a 16-year-old soccer player in Germany, took a Cardisiography test as part of a medical study that his club participated in. Heiko was physically fit and felt healthy.

His screening showed results that were noticeably different from a healthy heart. This was quite a surprise as coronary heart disease rare in adolescents under the age of 18. The physician overseeing the study recommended additional clinical screening, which indeed diagnosed Heiko with myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle.

As it turned out, Heiko had suffered a ruptured appendix about two years prior, and had spent several days in the hospital, which he eventually left without any symptoms. It is likely that the appendectomy caused the myocarditis, which remained undetected in follow-up examinations. While the inflammation of Heiko’s heart muscle is permanent and cannot be reversed, he is now examined regularly and treated to prevent future complications.

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Marc G., a 58-year-old from Nairobi in Africa, has been training at a high level for endurance sports for many years. When he suddenly had heart rhythm problems, he was examined by a cardiologist.

Although the cardiologist confirmed the rhythm disturbances to Marc G., no abnormality could be detected even in a catheter examination despite the high accuracy. However, a cardisiography showed clear signs of coronary heart disease in the measurement result.

An initial echocardiography test under physical stressshowed no abnormalities, but at a higher heart rate of 170 bpm, an ischemic area became visible, which clearly confirmed coronary disease as the cause of his cardiac arrhythmias. Heart rhythm disorders can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. It is therefore very important to find the cause. Unfortunately, Marc G. had to give up training at a high level, but he can continue training at a normal level.

Thanks to the knowledge of the existing coronary disease and well-coordinated medication and regular examinations, no further cardiac arrhythmias have occurred.

The case of Marc G. clearly shows how accurate and sensitive cardiography is, especially when compared to conventional methods.

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Patrick, a 28-year-old bodybuilder from London, lifts weights four to five times a week and even more before competitions. Patrick was examined as a participant in a Cardisio study.

He had no symptoms at the time of the screening, but felt fit and well. The Cardisiograph screening indicated an increased for coronary heart disease.

In response to this positive test, Patrick underwent additional cardiological examinations. An echocardiography diagnosed Patrick with early stage coronary heart disease. Since it was discovered early, the arteriosclerosis can now be significantly slowed down or even prevented with suitable drugs.

It was further determined that Patrick—as the result of years of extensive weight training—has a larger than average heart muscle. Due to the increased size, the heart muscle loses flexibility and variability over time, which can cause further health problems down the road.

Patrick continues to train, but now monitored and personalized to his health situation, and he makes sure to time his workouts so his heart gets the much-needed recovery time. Patrick regularly goes to check-ups and is grateful that the Cardisio test flagged his problem before it was too late.

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Anneliese B., a 72-year-old retiree from Darmstadt/Germany, was not feeling well on a hot Thursday night in August 2018. She was having difficulty breathing and felt exhausted.

She figured her discomfort was due to the unusually muggy, hot weather and went to bed early.

When her condition was unchanged the next morning, she decided to visit to her general practitioner for a checkup.

The routine examination (blood pressure, blood tests, physical examination and ECG) showed no abnormalities, so she went home feeling relieved.

However, her condition remained unchanged and she started to experience cold sweats. So the next morning, her nephew took her to the hospital for another examination. Again, the ECG results, etc. were inconclusive. An additional enzyme test (troponin) also showed no signs of any heart deficiency.

Coincidentally, a friend had told Anneliese about a new screening method—Cardisiography—and helped her get an immediate appointment with a physician who could perform the test.

The result showed a clearly positive Cardisio Index and the graphic representations of the vector directions indicated reduced blood flow to the heart.

The doctor immediately scheduled a catheter examination (cardio angiogram) for the following day.

That examination confirmed a partially blocked coronary artery, and Anneliese was supplied with two stents during the procedure. With her arteries now fully open again, Anneliese was able to go home after just one night in the hospital. She immediately felt well again and quickly regained her strength.

She now takes an oral medication and sees a cardiologist for an annual checkup.

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Selina D., a 32-year-old tax accountant from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, visited her general practitioner in April 2019 because she did not feel well. She felt weak and had sporadic chest pains.

Her doctor conducted both a resting ECG and a stress ECG.

Since Selina did not reach the required load due to muscle fatigue during the exercise test, the stress ECG had no significance. The resting ECG was normal and inconclusive. Since her doctor was not satisfied with the validity of the resting ECG, he referred Selina to a cardiologist.

The cardiologist then performed an echocardiogram, which also provided no clear result. To be on the safe side, Selina was referred to take a cardio-CT exam. However, it turned out she was severely allergic to the contrast agent, whereupon the cardio-CT was discontinued.

Next, the cardiologist recommended a catheter examination (cardio angiogram). She researched the pros and cons of that procedure, and was frightened by the risks and possible side effects. So she and her husband decided to consult another cardiologist for a second opinion.

Dr. Fernando R., who had recently started conducting Cardisiography tests, then performed the test on Selina. The test yielded a clearly negative result (i.e. no indication of coronary disease). Selina was relieved, but Dr. R. still wanted to confirm the result with an echocardiography to be certain.

Dr. R performed a medicine-induced stress echocardiography, which confirmed the result of the Cardisiography: there was no evidence of coronary disease. Selina was very relieved and satisfied that she gone for a second opinion before accepting the risk of an invasive catheter procedure.

This example provides two clear insights:

  1. There may be cases where patients are unnecessarily exposed to high-risk examinations such as a cardio angiogram.
  2. While echocardiography is a very accurate and effective method of examination, its success depends very much on how thoroughly the exam is performed and, above all, how experienced the practicing physician is in this method.